web analytics

Tennessee

Tennessee scootersWhether you are an experienced scooterist, or a newbie, why not check out the latest and greatest scooter models at your local Tennessee scooter dealer? Or Better yet, schedule a test drive! Distance: If you’re going to buy one then you’re going to have to transport it. Transporting a scooter costs money, especially if you have to rent a trailer. Make sure you calculate this cost into the overall cost of the scooter. On the other hand if you have your M class license and you go to a local Tennessee scooter dealer, you could drive it off the lot and straight home.

Repair and Maintenance: Another thing to consider is that you should be able to take your scooter back to the local dealer at any time for a repair. If you purchased elsewhere then you’re going to have to travel just to have your scooter repaired. A local business will be faster, more reliable and cost less money. Usually a scooter dealer is the best place to have yours repaired because they are more likely to have the expertise you need.

Scooter Dealers in Tennessee

Tennessee Scooter Dealer  Phone Number  City  Makes Sold
 A-1 Fun Cycles  615-889-6000  Nashville
 Alcoa Good Times  865-981-4444  Louisville
 America’s Motorsports  615-834-8990  Nashville
 American Power Sport Sales  731-632-3222  Adamsville
 BC Cycles  615-874-8747  Nashville
 Bellevue Suzuki Kawasaki  901-774-1870  Memphis
 Bloodworth Motorcycles  615-321-3311  Nashville
 Castle Powersports  615-851-4400  Nashville
 Cool Springs Powersports  615-778-1988  Franklin
 Dimelo Motorworks  615-200-7337  Nashville
 Don’s Cycles  423-803-0263  Chattanooga
 Honda of Chattanooga  423-855-5055  Chattanooga
 Honda Yamaha of Memphis  901-3345-0088  Memphis
 Howard’s Power Sports of Nashville  615-883-3251  Nashville
 Jim’s Motorcycle Sales  423-926-5561  Johnson City
 Lansford Kawasaki Suzuki Yamaha  931-484-1617  Crossville
 Kelly’s Cycles  865-688-7438  Knoxville
 KingSport Cycls  423-247-3847  Kingsport
 Mid-South Motoplex  931-368-0237  Clarksville
 Motion Plus  877-896-2499  Harriman
 Moto-4-U  865-688-MOTO  Knoxville
 Nashville Motorcycle Repair  615-742-4186  Nashville
 Red Dog Scooters  615-262-9500  Nashville
 Ritchie Powersports  888-260-1136  Maryville
 Scenic City Scooters  424-875-6445  Chattanooga
 Scooters Plus  901-297-4576  Memphis
 Sloan’s Motorcycle & ATV  615-893-0150  Murfreesboro
 Southern Power Sports  423-867-7541  Chattanooga
 Star Power Sports  865-851-8688  Knoxville
 Ultimate Cycle and Scooter  434-634-8151  Chattanooga
 Wholesale ATV  901-654-8129  Memphis

Tennessee Scooters

Parts Availability: If you buy from a local Tennessee scooter shop then you can call them at any time to have parts serviced or replaced. If you purchased your scooter elsewhere then it’s going to be a bit more of a hassle. Local scooter dealers will have the parts you need because they sell the scooter you bought. Usually a company will be more likely to keep parts in stock, or be able to order them for you on short notice.
Support Your Local Economy: Did you know that your local shop is likely owned by a small business? If you want to support your local economy, put money back into your area and improve your area then purchasing local is the way to go.

Expertise: Last but not least, a dealer will be someone that you can visit or call at any time for help with your scooter. Whether you want to know where to get modifications, how to get your M class license or just know more about the industry, benefits and lifestyle, chances are you can find the information at a local shop.

The confusion between mopeds and scooters is prevalent because both bikes are lightweight model motorcycles and over time, many of their characteristics have become interchanged. Today, both are very similar in appearance and style, and even manufacturers may sometimes confuse the two titles. As a rule of thumb, just choose a model based on what you want to use it for.

Choosing a motor scooter should involve research based on the capabilities and options presented by the bike as well finding the right scooter dealers. Setting a budget and sticking to it can also help buyers to choose the bike they want without going over the price they can afford. Usually what the scooter will be used for, such as driving between work, or driving for fun, or transporting groceries or etc. should be used as a major determining decision before choosing the bike. Many scooter manufacturers offer multiple models so make sure that you check out your options, compare prices, and research your needs before a
purchase.

Before you purchase a scooter, you should consider getting your M class license. This license allows you to ride scooters, motorcycles and other two wheeled vehicles in public and on roads. You can check with your local DMV for information. Most DMV locations will have M class license training, including the rental of a scooter that you can learn to drive on. Remember that some scooter sellers will not allow you to purchase a scooter without this license.

Any two wheeled bicycle or scooter that can be operated without pedaling is considered to be a motorized vehicle and is subject to a number of laws in the United States. Unfortunately, these laws do vary by city, state, and county, and each area can make their own laws, some of which are very restrictive. However, for the most part, the laws cover the same basic rules, which can be applied to any area in the U.S. These laws include the following.

Licensing: Anyone who intends to drive on a regular road or street rather than a sidewalk requires a motorcycle or moped license in order to drive legally. In addition, it is almost always a good idea to get licensing for any two wheeled motorized vehicle, no matter what the power, as regulations vary, even for low-power 25cc and under vehicles. If the scooter drives faster than 30 miles per hour, you most likely need a license to drive it.

Helmets: Helmets are required for any road-worthy vehicle when being driven on the road. Most three or four wheel scooter users can get away without a helmet on a sidewalk or street but two-wheel scooters almost always require a helmet for safety reasons. Many states require anyone under 18 to wear a helmet while on a scooter but an increasing number of states are requiring all drivers to wear one.

Tennessee Scooter Clubs

Memphis Kings               Tri Valley Scooter Clubs             Scoot Nashville

Many scooters cannot be driven on roadways but can be driven on sidewalks and on streets. Typically any lightweight scooter such as a sit-down three wheeled scooter is not allowed on the road. However, a larger scooter that is nearing motorcycle class may be allowed on the road. For this reason, it is important to check up with the manufacturer on the specific scooter in question. Some motor scooters are street legal but not road worthy and others are not fit for either. In general, you want a scooter to be able to drive at least 75 miles per hour in order to drive on the road. Any scooter that has an engine lower than 50cc is almost definitely not street legal. A scooter that can go 30 miles per hour is probably sufficient for driving in slow traffic around town, but not for any other types of roads.

Finally, many states have specific safety regulations regarding motor scooters. Depending on the state these regulations can include that the scooter must have fenders, or that the driver must legally register and license their scooter. These regulations greatly vary from state to state, so it is important to have a discussion with the local DMV to decide what you have to do.

Scooter laws are slowly but steadily increasing across the United States for a number of reasons. The first is that scooter and moped sales are up about 7-8% per year as more people look for fuel efficient transport. Unfortunately, scooter related accidents are up 50%, leading to a widespread addition of new laws, bills, and restrictions for scooter owners. Typically the best way to get localized information is to go to the DMV, or talk with your local scooter retailer to see if they have any information for you.

Many different scooter insurance companies offer a wide array of coverage policies and offer savings for multiple bikes or when you combine your insurance with a home, auto, life, health policy. In fact, in many state scooter laws require that you carry insurance for your scooter or you may face hefty fines. State scooter laws and insurance requirements vary from state to state.  Other local laws are related to the engine size of the scooter.

Unlike automobile insurance, not every state requires scooterists to have at a bare minimum liability insurance to cover medical costs and property damage of another party if found at fault in the accident. Additionally, if the scooter is financed, the finance company may require you to carry comprehensive and collision coverage as well. While there are similarities between purchasing automobile and motorcycle insurance coverage, knowing the differences can save money while making sure you have adequate coverage for your needs.

The type of coverage a scooter owner needs depends can sometimes depend on how the scooter is used. For example, if a motorcyclist does not have another person riding on the bike, then it is possible to opt out of coverage to insure a passenger. For motorcyclists in the colder regions of the country, it is possible to get coverage for the months that the motorcycle is not in storage. If the motorcycle is older and not financed, it might not be worth carrying collision and comprehensive insurance, since the cost of the premiums and the deductible will likely exceed the amount the motorcycle is worth.

Insurance for Scooters in Tennessee

The means to saving on scooter insurance premium starts with understanding what determines the rate the insurance company charges for scooter insurance. The calculations start with the type of scooter owned. The premium rate is higher for sports models of scooter, so even though the new great looking bike with all the speed features might impress others, it will depress a bank account balance with the insurance payments as compared to a standard older scooter. Age also plays a factor in determining the rate a motorcyclist pays; those who are in their 20’s pay higher rates than older  riders pay. In addition, the amount of the deductible affects the insurance premium, if you can carry a higher deductible, in essence self-insure for minor accidents; it is possible to pay a lower premium.

Once motor scooter insurance is obtained, strategies exist to keep insurance premiums reasonable and even reduce them. When a motorcyclist has small claims, it is better to go ahead and pay the expense rather file a claim because the insurance carrier considers each claim filed as evidence as increased risk. Additionally, check your driving record periodically as error can arise just as they do in credit reports. As a point of information, the credit score of a motorcyclist also affects insurance rates so try to maintain a good credit score.

While it make little sense to over pay for insurance coverage, it is wise not to under insure either, since the rifer will be held financially responsible for any expenses not covered by insurance. With research and planning, you can find scooter insurance coverage which fits both his circumstances as well as his budget.

Tennessee Scooter Laws

Scooter Laws vary from state to state.  For more information about licensing requirements and scooter laws in Tennessee, click here